Quail with Asian Spices

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Serves 4

Ingredients

Six 3-ounce quail (preferably partially boned)

1/4 cup vegetable oil

1 cup soy sauce

1 cup water

4 shallots, minced

1/4 cup rice vinegar

2 tablespoons five-spice powder

2 tablespoons light brown sugar

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon coarsely cracked black peppercorns

 

Method of cooking

Marinating

For best results do this first step the night before you actually intend to do the dish. In a medium saucepan, mix the soy sauce with the water, rice vinegar, brown sugar, five-spice powder, shallots,  ginger, garlic and peppercorns. Simmer over moderately high heat for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Cool down to room temperature, then strain the sauce into a large bowl. Place the quail in the bowl and coat them in the sauce. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. If you're going to do it on the same day then leave the quail meet in the marinated in the fridge for at least three hours.

The next day bring the meat back to room temperature, remove from the marinade and pat dry.

Cooking

Heat the oil in a large skillet. Add the quail meat and cook over high heat until the skin is browned and the meat is rare. This will take about 3 minutes per side. Cut the quail in half lengthwise and serve hot, with Watercress Salad.

Open a bottle of Pinot Noire for this occasion, it goes well with asian spices.

An easy to make excellent quail dish with great asian flavour.

 

Watercress salad recipe

Serves 4

Ingredients

5 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 leeks, white parts only, sliced into very thin rings

Salt and freshly ground pepper

1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

1 tablespoon minced shallots

1 1/2 tablespoons hazelnut, walnut or olive oil

1 bunch of watercress (6 ounces), thick stems discarded

2 cups finely shredded red cabbage

1/4 cup finely chopped chives, for garnish

 

Method of cooking

Heat 2 1/2 tablespoons of vegetable oil in a large, heavy skillet. Add half the leeks, season with salt and pepper and cook over moderate heat until lightly browned, about 2 minutes; transfer to paper towels. Repeat with the remaining 2 1/2 tablespoons of vegetable oil and the remaining leeks.

In a large bowl, whisk the soy sauce with the vinegar, shallots and a large pinch of salt. Slowly whisk in the hazelnut oil. Add the watercress and cabbage to the bowl along with half the fried leeks, season with salt and pepper and toss well. Garnish with the remaining fried leeks and the chives and serve.

 

Source: foodandvine.com

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